Tag Archives: Maine Literature

Buying W&I 2011, A Guide, Part I

Did you know you can find the latest edition of Words and Images in bookstores far and wide?

In Albany, NY, Words and Images may be purchased at the locally-run independent bookstore The Book House. You may also find the journal in The Book House’s sister store in Troy, NY – Market Block Books.

Here in Maine, you may purchase your very own, shiny and new copy of Words and Images at USM’s Bookstore, as well as one of our favorite shops in downtown Portland, Longfellow Books.

So maybe it’s less far and wide, and more centered around New England – but if you’d like to see Words and Images in a bookstore closer to you, send us a message and we’ll do our best to get it out there.

Submissions for Words and Images 2012

…Open on August 1st! ALL are welcome to submit and we hope to see a lot of submissions from USM writers.

We have some guidelines set out, as well as where to send your work all listed right here.

Stay tuned for details on this years fiction/poetry contest, which will be a revival of the Dos Cosas Award, which first appeared in our 2009 issue.

Words & Images 2011: Resurgam! Book Release Party

Please join us for an evening of drinks, free food, dancing, musical performance and readings from locally grown and nationally acclaimed writers and artists!

When: April 29th 2011, 6 – 9 PM
Where: Talbot Lecture Hall, Luther Bonny
92  Bedford St, Portland, Maine

Our event will feature an exclusive reading from Townie: A Memoir by bestselling author Andre Dubus III, as well as readings and award presentations by Adrian Blevins, USM President Selma Botman, Kate Cheney Chappell and a special musical performance by Olas.

There will be free food provided by Panera and Bruce’s Burritos , coffee provided by Bard Coffee and a cash bar.

Here’s a video of Olas performing “El Tiempo” to whet your appetite:

The 2011 issue of Words & Images is here!

…almost.

We received 500 copies of the journal from the printers today, and all 500 of them are might fine looking!
Copies of the journal will be available for purchase on April 29th during our release party and from then on, at the USM Bookstore as well as other local bookstore (full list to be released soon.)

Stay tuned for event details…

The Editors are not Robots (Part Five): Caroline O’Connor Thomas

carolines-bio-pic-smallCaroline O’Connor Thomas has lived in too many locations in the Boston area, including: Somerville, Revere, the North End, Cambridge, Medford. She has slept under beds, in beds and on floors. Prefers night, but thinks day has some excellent qualities. Likes mountains as much as skyscrapers. She takes music courses that do not have anything to do with her major in English. Being the poetry editor of Words and Images 2009, she enjoys reading and writing poems. Favorite poem as of today: Wherever You Are, Be Somewhere Else by Denise Riley. It does not take much prompting to get her to dance/ make a fool of herself. Her favorite feeling is indescribable but it includes being a stranger in a crowd/ a small thing in a stream.  Despite the heading of this post, Caroline may actually be a robot. The previous sentence is a lie, as Caroline is secretly sensitive and romantic (please don’t tell anyone). Enjoys adventures in cars with friends, particularly if it involves going to the 76 Diner in Latham, NY past midnight. Does not exclude rap or country music from the blanket statement “I like all kinds of music.” Caroline is going to England next semester, where she hopes to acquire a British accent, meet Julian Barratt of The Mighty Boosh and single handedly destroy Stonehenge (just kidding). If you are a poem that looks sparse on the page but features heavy words that bend their very definitions and like long walks on the beach, soft caresses and the song “Monkey Gone to Heaven” by the Pixies, please contact Caroline, as you may be her soul mate. Take a chance, buy her a drink, read her poetry – you’ve got nothing to lose.

Those interested can read a few of Caroline’s poems here: (LINK!). Her thoughts are also available for mass consumption: (LINK!).

The Editors are not Robots (Part Four): Benjamin Rybeck

bens-bio-picBenjamin Rybeck is the publishing director of Words and Images; from 2007-2008, he served as managing editor. He considers his most important job to be finding the right people with whom to work, and being as he has put together a staff replete with editors who are smarter than he, his job sometimes seems almost ridiculously easy.

Rybeck is a full time English major at the University of Southern Maine, interested in interdisciplinary studies. He is especially drawn to the following: the films of Paul Thomas Anderson and the French New Wave; the stories of Raymond Carver, Flannery O’Connor, and Charles D’Ambrosio; “Winesburg, Ohio”; all things James Bond; and the TV series The Wire.

He’s hoping to find fiction and poetry that all those other idiot literary journals have missed; after all, tons of great stories and poems go to sleep unpublished each night. He’s not looking for “perfect” work, because “perfect” work lacks the rough edges where the soul of the artist can be seen bursting out, trying to struggle free from under a pile of technique, trying to breathe again. Jonathan Franzen’s “The Corrections,” a novel with a million digressions, is preferable to Geraldine Brooks’ “March,” a perfectly controlled story, because “The Corrections” has energy in its imperfections, and “March” seems overworked and smoothed out until it lies dead on the page.

Sometimes he has trouble finding the time to exercise.

The Editors are not Robots (Part One): Seth A. Bishop

Seth A. Bishop is Managing Editor for Words and Images 2009. While a student of Political Science at the University of Southern Maine, he has made it a point to pursue interests outside of his major and, through doing so, has manufactured a relatively unique angle of vision influenced by Political Theory, Sociology, Cultural Studies, and Philosophy. The overarching theme of Seth’s studies has been the exploration of the interplay between individuals and social institutions, be they formal institutions such as the state, or informal abstractions of collective identity. He anticipates the completion of his degree in the Spring of 2009, at which point he intends to take a year off before applying to Graduate programs for Political Theory and a few interdisciplinary Social and Political Thought programs.

Seth’s literary interests are predominantly of the so-called ‘low art’ variety. An avid reader of comics and graphic novels, he considers the comic book to be a valuable yet often ignored cultural artifact that deserves greater attention as both an object of admiration and critical analysis. Toward this end, Seth is currently working on a content analysis of Captain America that examines the perpetually evolving nationalist narrative presented within the comic as well as the unique manner comics deliver collective identity narratives to disparate audiences. For similar reasons as his love of comics, he also appreciates film, science fiction in its various forms, and popular music.

Although his writing is exclusively academic, Seth appreciates reading prose and poetry. If he did not, one would assume he would not work for a literary journal.