Tag Archives: robots

Contest Announcement!

Words & Images would like to announce a contest open exclusively to USM students, The Dos Cosas Award.

“Dos Cosas” is Spanish for “two things.” Why two things, you ask? And why in Spanish – considering we’re in Maine and none of our staff speak Spanish?: “Maybe all literature is just two things banging together. Characters banging against settings; dialogue banging against secondary action; similies banging against alliteration; memory banging against the present moment.  …All writing should hold a contradiction. Of course, those aforementioned pairs aren’t really contradictions. But man oh man, a contradiction surely must consist of two things.”
-Benjamin Rybeck, Publishing Director 2009

And Spanish sounds more fun. Though “Deux Choses” has a certain allure as well…

So here it is: Submit up to five poems or a short fiction piece of less than 5,000 words by December 1st. The winner, selected by a panel of peer judges will receive $500 dollars for their outstanding work and an opportunity to read their piece at the Words & Images 2012 journal release party.

There is no contest entry fee, but we must reiterate – this contest is only for USM students. Send your submissions to the appropriate e-mail addresses and make sure to indicate your piece is for the Dos Cosas Award.

wordsandimagespoetry @ gmail.com
wordsandimagesprose @ gmail.com

The Editors are not Robots (Part Seven): Jeff Hodenberg

jeffs-bio-pic-smallJeff Hodenberg is a poetry editor and senior English major at USM. He considers himself a jack of all trades, enjoying myriad styles of literature and art (e.g. Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, Vonegut, Hemingway, Blake, Bukowski, Medieval and Gothic texts). On at least one occasion he has made the claim, “Paradise Lost is the greatest book ever written, and I will punch you in the face if you dare disagree.” As a philosophy minor, he enjoys the gritty ideas and questions posed by Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, and Baruch Spinoza.

Outside of his love of literature, Jeff enjoys video games (often until he has mere hours to turn in a paper), music (from Johnny Cash to Cannibal Corpse to Wu Tang Clan), comic books and graphic novels (Spawn, Aliens, and DMZ, to name a few), watching cartoons, and other things equally nerdy.

Jeff will be completing his studies at USM in the Spring of 2009 and moving to Japan to teach English for a few years. Beyond that, he will travel wherever the winds may take him to pursue his master’s degree and eventual PhD, thus allowing him to lord his lofty intellect over students everywhere

The Editors are not Robots (Part Five): Caroline O’Connor Thomas

carolines-bio-pic-smallCaroline O’Connor Thomas has lived in too many locations in the Boston area, including: Somerville, Revere, the North End, Cambridge, Medford. She has slept under beds, in beds and on floors. Prefers night, but thinks day has some excellent qualities. Likes mountains as much as skyscrapers. She takes music courses that do not have anything to do with her major in English. Being the poetry editor of Words and Images 2009, she enjoys reading and writing poems. Favorite poem as of today: Wherever You Are, Be Somewhere Else by Denise Riley. It does not take much prompting to get her to dance/ make a fool of herself. Her favorite feeling is indescribable but it includes being a stranger in a crowd/ a small thing in a stream.  Despite the heading of this post, Caroline may actually be a robot. The previous sentence is a lie, as Caroline is secretly sensitive and romantic (please don’t tell anyone). Enjoys adventures in cars with friends, particularly if it involves going to the 76 Diner in Latham, NY past midnight. Does not exclude rap or country music from the blanket statement “I like all kinds of music.” Caroline is going to England next semester, where she hopes to acquire a British accent, meet Julian Barratt of The Mighty Boosh and single handedly destroy Stonehenge (just kidding). If you are a poem that looks sparse on the page but features heavy words that bend their very definitions and like long walks on the beach, soft caresses and the song “Monkey Gone to Heaven” by the Pixies, please contact Caroline, as you may be her soul mate. Take a chance, buy her a drink, read her poetry – you’ve got nothing to lose.

Those interested can read a few of Caroline’s poems here: (LINK!). Her thoughts are also available for mass consumption: (LINK!).

The Editors are not Robots (Part Four): Benjamin Rybeck

bens-bio-picBenjamin Rybeck is the publishing director of Words and Images; from 2007-2008, he served as managing editor. He considers his most important job to be finding the right people with whom to work, and being as he has put together a staff replete with editors who are smarter than he, his job sometimes seems almost ridiculously easy.

Rybeck is a full time English major at the University of Southern Maine, interested in interdisciplinary studies. He is especially drawn to the following: the films of Paul Thomas Anderson and the French New Wave; the stories of Raymond Carver, Flannery O’Connor, and Charles D’Ambrosio; “Winesburg, Ohio”; all things James Bond; and the TV series The Wire.

He’s hoping to find fiction and poetry that all those other idiot literary journals have missed; after all, tons of great stories and poems go to sleep unpublished each night. He’s not looking for “perfect” work, because “perfect” work lacks the rough edges where the soul of the artist can be seen bursting out, trying to struggle free from under a pile of technique, trying to breathe again. Jonathan Franzen’s “The Corrections,” a novel with a million digressions, is preferable to Geraldine Brooks’ “March,” a perfectly controlled story, because “The Corrections” has energy in its imperfections, and “March” seems overworked and smoothed out until it lies dead on the page.

Sometimes he has trouble finding the time to exercise.

The Editors are not Robots (Part Three): Jill Jacobs

jills-bio-pic2Jill Jacobs is one of the two fiction editors for Words and Images 2009. By day, she is a Piano Performance major who studies under Laura Kargul; under the cover of night, she writes, and feasts upon literature to such a fiendish extent that her room currently resembles a library. Though Jill’s two passions seem disparate, she finds each process to be a fairly similar journey towards perfection; both require manic amounts of analysis, and an obsessive, unyielding eye for detail.

Jill’s literary tastes fluctuate according to her mood. Sometimes, she finds she must immerse herself in history books on the Napoleonic Wars; sometimes, she must binge on Russian classics, or partake in a spot of science fiction parody. Jill likes mysteries, be they of happenstance or character, and endings that surprise her. She believes many of the best books sit unnoticed in children and YA sections around the world. For the most part, genre does not influence her; she is willing to love any story, so long as it moves her.

Outside of classical music and literary pursuits, Jill enjoys listening to bands that no one has heard of, watching fabulously cheesy 80s movies, and indulging in retail therapy.

After the completion of her undergraduate degree in Spring 2010, Jill plans to flutter off to graduate school, where she will keep up on her reading and writing, and eventually be overcome with madness when she attempts to apply Schenkerian analysis to anything by Robert Schumann.

The Editors are not Robots (Part One): Seth A. Bishop

Seth A. Bishop is Managing Editor for Words and Images 2009. While a student of Political Science at the University of Southern Maine, he has made it a point to pursue interests outside of his major and, through doing so, has manufactured a relatively unique angle of vision influenced by Political Theory, Sociology, Cultural Studies, and Philosophy. The overarching theme of Seth’s studies has been the exploration of the interplay between individuals and social institutions, be they formal institutions such as the state, or informal abstractions of collective identity. He anticipates the completion of his degree in the Spring of 2009, at which point he intends to take a year off before applying to Graduate programs for Political Theory and a few interdisciplinary Social and Political Thought programs.

Seth’s literary interests are predominantly of the so-called ‘low art’ variety. An avid reader of comics and graphic novels, he considers the comic book to be a valuable yet often ignored cultural artifact that deserves greater attention as both an object of admiration and critical analysis. Toward this end, Seth is currently working on a content analysis of Captain America that examines the perpetually evolving nationalist narrative presented within the comic as well as the unique manner comics deliver collective identity narratives to disparate audiences. For similar reasons as his love of comics, he also appreciates film, science fiction in its various forms, and popular music.

Although his writing is exclusively academic, Seth appreciates reading prose and poetry. If he did not, one would assume he would not work for a literary journal.